Reviews Articles

Old Rage, by Sheila Hancock

22 September 2022 | by Nick Wilde

Book cover of Old Rage, by Sheila Hancock |

As many readers will know, Sheila Hancock takes her Quakerism seriously. In this latest work of autobiography (covering 2016 to 2021), she begins with a note about becoming a dame. Should she accept? Is it in keeping with a Quaker belief in equality? She decides that to turn it down would be...

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The Salt of the Earth, by Wim Wenders and Juliano Ribeiro Salgado

15 September 2022 | by Helen Porter

'Over twenty years they planted 2.7 million trees.' |

This 2014 film, which chronicles the life’s work of the photographer Sebastião Salgado, is a hard watch. The camera is pitiless, presenting horrific images – corpses in Rwanda, skeletal bodies in the Sahel – but with deep humanity and empathy.

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The Last Days, by Ali Millar

15 September 2022 | by Robert Ashton

‘Ali Millar is brutally frank about her life and experiences.’ | Book cover of The Last Days, by Ali Millar

I’ve always found Jehovah’s Witnesses fascinating and, over the years, have come to know several reasonably well. But only one, Kevin our window cleaner, has ever been prepared to talk about faith. We’ve chatted about how he spends Saturdays knocking on doors, and how he remains cheerful,...

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Forgiveness: An exploration, by Marina Cantacuzino

08 September 2022 | by Tim Newell

‘Forgiveness is seen as a gift when it is experienced.’ | Book cover of Forgiveness: An exploration, by Marina Cantacuzino

This is a significantly hopeful book for our time. We’ve been through the extended trauma of Covid (its impact on our health and our reaction to its mismanagement), and the continuing uncertainty and lack of confidence in our political leadership, direction and competence. The coarsening of public discourse and...

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White Debt: The Demerara Uprising and Britain’s legacy of slavery, by Thomas Harding

01 September 2022 | by Kathleen Bell

'As Quakers, we tend to be keener to describe our anti-slavery activities than to acknowledge the profit Quakers made from slavery.' | Book cover of White Debt: The Demerara Uprising and Britain’s legacy of slavery, by Thomas Harding

We inherit a past in which damage was done. We can’t cure the damage, but its effects persist. It presents us with responsibilities.

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The Bullet in the Pawpaw: Theatre and AIDS in South Africa, by Kim Hope

25 August 2022 | by Marian Liebmann

'This story should be read by all of us. It shows how one person can act as a catalyst for a process and a project that benefits many people.' | Book cover of The Bullet in the Pawpaw: Theatre and AIDS in South Africa, by Kim Hope

In March 2003 I was on my way to Kuruman Moffat Mission in South Africa. I was going to lead some talks and workshops on art therapy, at a conference of people working in prisons. On the way I had arranged a couple of meetings in Johannesburg with conflict resolution organisations,...

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Listening as Quaker Practice, by James McCarthy

28 July 2022 | by Diana Lampen

‘True listening is not a skill to be added on, but an integral element of Quaker practice.' | Book cover of Listening as Quaker Practice, by James McCarthy

This little Kindlers book is a gem. It explores listening in depth from a Quaker perspective and draws on many Friends’ experiences.

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Queer Holiness, by Charlie Bell

28 July 2022 | by David Wilson

'For those outside gay-affirming churches like the Society of Friends, this will be a radical book.' | Book cover of Queer Holiness, by Charlie Bell

Unlike many who hold forth on the topic of LGBT+ people and the church, Charlie Bell is eminently qualified to talk about it. He is a consultant psychiatrist and academic, and also a curate at a south London Anglican church.

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Twist of Love, by Rosemary May Wells

21 July 2022 | by Sue Wheeler

‘The world did not topple over – / It was made to stop in its tracks.’ | Book cover of Twist of Love, by Rosemary May Wells

Rosemary May Wells’ fourth collection of poems is the companion to her first, God is an Onion. It encompasses global and everyday life events, as well as people and friendships, and the natural world and the local area. All this is done with warmth, love and grace.

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What’s Eating the Universe? And other cosmic questions, by Paul Davies

14 July 2022 | by Reg Naulty | 2 comments

'The everyday world we experience is not always a reliable guide to physical reality.' | Book cover of What’s Eating the Universe? And other cosmic questions, by Paul Davies

This book, written with Paul Davies’ trademark clarity and humour, answers many questions we may have about contemporary physics. For example, does it still believe in anti-matter? Somewhat embarrassingly, we read that the first anti-matter particle, the positron, an electron with a positive charge, was discovered ninety years ago. On...

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